highseasalliance.org

Protecting the Ocean We Need - Securing the Future We Want

Since its founding in 2011, the High Seas Alliance (HSA) with its 37+ non-governmental members and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has been working towards protecting the 50% of the planet that is the high seas. As the region of the global ocean that is beyond national jurisdiction, the high seas includes some of the most biologically important, least protected, and most critically threatened ecosystems in the world.

HSA members work together to inspire, inform and engage the public, decision-makers and experts to support and strengthen high seas governance and conservation, as well as cooperating towards the establishment of high seas protected areas. 

Our current priority is to ensure that an intergovernmental conference taking place at the United Nations from 2018-2020 for the development of a new legally binding treaty under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea results in robust protection for marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction. The next two years are a particularly critical time as States from around the world negotiate the content of the treaty.

Currently, there are no legally binding mechanisms for establishing marine protected areas outside States’ territorial seas, or for undertaking environmental impact assessments. Yet increasing impacts from overfishing, climate change, deep-seabed mining and shipping continue to negatively affect biodiversity on the high seas.

HSA is working to ensure that treaty negotiations result in robust and effective conservation measures that address gaps in current ocean governance.

The High Seas Alliance (HSA) and the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC), congratulate ocean champion Kristina Gjerde for winning this year’s Visionary Ocean Award.

FREE REGISTRATION OPEN

21 June 2018, 9h30-17h45: at Oceanographic Institute, 195 Rue St Jacques, Paris - Metro: Luxembourg

Three months before negotiations of an international instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of high seas biodiversity begin at the United Nations in New York.

Source: Nature

Author: Olive Heffernan

As the United Nations prepares a historic treaty to protect the oceans, scientists highlight what’s needed for success.